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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
fighting a civil rights and virginia. we have a state where they want to go backward. the federal government can do a great job intervening in the delivery of recovery support services. meaning the federal dollars -- to me it would make sense to make them spend a small portion on recovery support services, to include housing. housing is a critical element in recovery. i guess my thought process goes -- somehow forced the state to discriminate against recovery, like they do in virginia, to spend some of the federal dollars on the offensive recovery support services. that is the nature of my thought process. by doing so, we can really reduce --, help recovery. to block out recovery people -- it is just insane to me. the state is not going to change. but the federal government if you just make a rule or regulation, you have got to spend a small amount of recovery and stop blowing it to agencies and virginia. i would be glad to elaborate after the press conference, of course. but that is the general thought and presidents. -- precedence. >> we have some programs that are specific arou
are involved in the civil rights movement or in the anti-vietnam war demonstrations or about black preachers who've been so involved in american politics. is it only conservative ministers that you object to? >> no. what i object to -- -- what i object to -- what i object to is someone seeking to use his faith to question the faith of another or to use that faith and seek to use the power of government to impose it on others. a minister who is in civil rights or in the conservative movement, because he believes his faith instructs him to do that, i admire. the fact that the faith speaks to us and that we are moral people, hopefully, i accept and rejoice in. it's when you try to use that to undermine the integrity of private political -- or private religious faith and the use of the state is where -- for the most personal decisions in american life -- that's where i draw the line. >> thank you. now, mr. president, rebuttal. >> yes, it's very difficult to rebut, because i find myself in so much agreement with mr. mondale. i, too, want that wall that is in the constitution of separation of chur
." this is a very old statute enacted by the first congress. it has sat dormant for 170 years. in some civil right type folks picked it up. -- been some civil right type folks picked it up and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign. the defendant is foreign. the tour took place in some foreign place. they say you have jurisdiction over this. courts have been going for this. they have been allowing some of these cases to go forward. this case raised the question of the of -- in this particular case, it took place in nigeria. the guy says the nigerian government committed these against me. they mistreated me. these foreign will company's work implicit -- foreign companies were implicit. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. the defendant say this is not apply to corporations. he cannot actually sue a corporation under the statute. that was their claim. they did something very unusual. they actually said we want to consider a broader question. we would like you to brief not just this question of does it apply to corporations, but also doesn't apply extraterritor
. >> you know, one thing that really struck me was his involvement in the civil rights. i look at the country today, there are so many people that don't know the history, have no clue about the history of civil rights. here is your father speaking very passionately about a young black student who had been admitted to the university of mississippi. they were protesting on the grounds. they did not want james meredith there. your father was talking to the governor about that. >> we got to get order up there. that's what we thought was going to happen. >> mr. president, please, why don't you stop -- >> how can i remove him governor when there's a riot in the street and he might step out of the building and something -- let's get order up there and then we can do something. >> we've got to get somebody out there to get order and stop the firing and the shooting. then you and i will talk on the phone about meredith. first we've got to get order. >> he's really mad. i know the tone from my aunts and uncles. civil rights went from being important but not a heated issue during his pres
years but in virginia specifically not all states are equal. we still fight civil rights in virginia and we have a state where they want to go backward it appears. now the federal government is doing a great job intervening in the delivery of recovery support services, meaning those federal dollars the come from virginia. to me it would make sense to make them spend a small portion on recovery support services to include housing. housing is a critical missing element in recovery so i guess my thought process to samhsa and somehow force the state to discriminate against recovery like they do in virginia and spend some of those dollars on the authentic recovery and support service. that really is the nature of my thought process. by doing so we could really reduce the recidivism and increase recovery. the power to recover people is incredible and to block out the recovery principle from delivering those services, but like i say the state is not going to change but the federal government if you would just make a rule or regulation with those federal -- you have to spend a small amount o
win and my retort is if you look back over the years, from women's suffrage, civil rights, to more recently the alternative ener movement, have been borne from third parties garn hing enough votes away from the two major political parties so engrained in the status quo that they never impose the sweeping changes so i hope you can comment on the role of third parties not necessarily in winning elections but in changing the agenda to the point where we get the changes we end up treasuring over the next century. host: thank you for the call. dr. jill stein. guest: thank you for making that point, which is very important. in fact, what so many people call progress in this country, whether you talk about women getting the right to vote, the abbitionist slavery, the protection of workers in the workplace, the right to organize, the 40 hour work week, child labor laws, social social security, the new deal, you name it, all of these have come out of independent third parties, because as you say, the party that is are bought and paid for by large corporations which are part of the status qu
the alien torched statute. -- alien tort statute. any civil action by agent alien's right toward the only committed and a violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the united states, this is an old statute enacted by the first congress which sat dormant for 170 years. then some civil-rights folks pick them up and they started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign, the defendant is foreign, and report to a place in some foreign place. they come into in new york federal court and say you have jurisdiction over this and courts have been allowing some of these cases to go forward, strange as it sounds. this case raised the question -- this takes place in nigeria and the guy says he mistreated me, tortured me and so forth. these foreign oil companies were composite and help the nigerian company do this to me -- these companies work implicit. you can actually sue incorporation under this statute and that was their claim last year. the u.s. supreme court heard arguments in the case and did something very unusual -- they actually said to the parties we want to consider a broader q
to get ahead of things, the plaintiffs here are attorneys, civil rights activists and others who are in regular contact with people overseas particularly people who might well be the subject of electronic surveillance by the federal government and they are challenging the law that allows electronic surveillance, this wiretapping because they're concerned that their case will be picked up. they're claiming to have standing to challenge this law because even though the surveillance might be directed overseas to people they're talking to get their dedication will get picked up in the course of that surveillance and so therefore they have the right to challenge it in court. that is the standing issue we we are dealing with. just to get to the merits for a minute, and the aftermath of the exposÉ in the mid-70's about various abuses in the intelligence community and in short in short is set up a system by which the executive branch would have to go to the court surveillance court here in d.c. and get permission when they wanted to do wiretapping for national security purpose to give s
for the new term -- expected to be, civil rights. >>> plus kobe bryant, dropping a little insight on what it's like to play pick-up with the president. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. my brother doesn't look like a heart attack patient. i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. i'm a fighter and now i don't have that fear. i'm a fighter you're not just looking for a by house. eyes you're looking for a place for your life to happen. want my recipe for healthier hair color? natural instincts! formulated with aloe, vitamin and antioxidants natural instincts has a system that's a healthier way to radiant color. indulge... with natural instincts. less guilt, more gorgeous. bori
enacted by the first congress. but it sat dormant for 170 odd years. then some civil rights type folks picked it up and human rights type folks and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign, the defendant is foreign, and the tort took place in some foreign place and they are bringing it to u.s. courts. so a paraguayan plaintiff and a pair of wayne defendant and it took place in her way. so the ticket to a u.s. -- a paraguayan plaintiff and a paraguayan defendant and it took place in paraguay. so they take it to the u.s. in this particular case, k iobal takes place in nigeria. and the nigerian government mistreated me, torture and so forth and these will companies, foreign oil companies, were complice it, helping the nigerian government do this to me. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. and the oil companies defendants say that this does not apply to corporations. you cannot sue a corporation under this statute. that was their claim last year at the supreme court and the u.s. supreme court heard arguments in the case and did something very unusual.
, engaged the senators in discussion of how he felt about the issues, and it became clear he felt the civil rights act, a thomas just think, he thought there was no such thing as a right to privacy to the constitution, and the senate by a vote of 58-42 said to conservative and he was voted down. ronald reagan nominated instead to that seat anthony kennedy, who was serving a liberal but was certainly no robert bork either. and he has had a long and distinguished career as, now the swing vote on the court. and that really, that set, that really set up the rehnquist years. accord which i wrote about in my last book, "the nine," and when i started looking at the supreme court in a serious way as a writer, i was inspired by book that i'm sure is familiar to many of you called the brethren by scott armstrong and bob woodward, really a great book, first real behind the scenes book of the supreme court. and 15, the theme of the book was also justices, regardless of politics couldn't stand were in burger. they thought he was at pompous jerk. that sort of contention has been the rule more than the ex
guaranteed act, on par with the civil-rights of the 1960's. host: john from illinois. caller: the only problem that i have is about the tax issue. the reason why i say that is our taxes in this country have never been set up to be fair. what they were set up for was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes. working-class and the port were supposed to pay the majority of theirs in homeowners' taxes, city and state taxes -- ordering class and the poor. everything is out of sorts. when you are on fixed income and these states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government will have such a lower one. anybody i fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator that costs $400, will have about a $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. the ones it will hurt our people that are retired, people that are on disability, things like that. otherwise, i am completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in 1988. i voted for paul brown. i think he -- i can remember what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. once.ed for ross p
these cases can be so big they can be exported. civil-rights concerned about cutting back on class-action. too expensive to litigate each case one by one. the justices in the comcast case will consider the question of how much judges should decide about the case before certifying and saying everyone can be in all the lawsuits together. do they have to figure route if all these people and have one theory of damages or have to look at whether there was a fraud or securities fraud case so there will be more in line of the wal-mart decision about class-action procedure? two tiny actions. people in college try to get text books that are not incredibly expensive. the supreme court has a copyright case about what happens with market goods. text books made overseas when sold at a lower price are imported to the united states. producer of that book or any other copyrighted material have a right to limit it coming into the united states and actually a body on the questions of when a lawsuit is moved. a very lawyer the the the the issue but those who are interested and are practicing lawyers there are fi
versus board. i said i think this is the civil rights issue of our generation. the dividing line is not race or class, but around educational opportunity. if we're serious about closing the achievement gap, we have to close the opportunity gap. i do not think we have had anything near the sense of urgency and commitment to closing those gaps that we need to. to look at the staggering inequities and inequalities, we have to get better faster. all those things compel us to act. the president has provided leadership. he understands what is at stake. congress has been supportive. we have to work on this together and put politics and the ideology aside. we have to educate our way to a better economy. i talk about a cradle to career agenda. we have to start with early childhood education. i could make a compelling case that is the best investment we can make. if we can get our babies into kindergarten and ready to read, we start to close the gaps. if we do not do that, we're playing catch-up. we play catch up at every level of the education system. many of our colleges today, 50% of yo
and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. president obama won by 600,000 boats in pennsylvania last time. this really does determine the election. i don't care who you are for. this will determine the election. it is a huge problem or the country. we should be celebrating voters going to the polls, not putting impediments in their way. host: the radio program " democracy now" turns 25 this year? guest: we started in 1996. we were just on radio. the week of september 11, 2001, we started on the first television station in new york city on public access. then it just caught on like wildfire. beyond the election and more television stations aired us and radio stations and npr stations and pbs stations all over the countr
hispanics. it is a civil rights group the advancement project that came out talking about the potential impact of all of the various efforts in particularly states where there is a big latino population. is that related to this voter i.d. or you know, what other forms, attempts of voter suppression. >> it is related to voter i.d. but we're seeing a lot of other techniques. so in florida, they made it very, very hard to do voter registration drives, the paperwork requirements were very ominous and it was a crime if you didn't comply with them. most organizations including the league of women voters decide they didn't want to play. that law was struck down by a federal court but it did a lot of damage while it was in effect. you're seeing attempts to take away people's ability to vote early so we've got -- took early voting starting in iowa in places like ohio and florida. you're seeing laws passed to reduce the number of states where early voting can happen. that does have an impact, like i said, minority voter
in the civil rights movement. so many people fought s i could express my views and vote and have a say. i never want to take that for granted. not as a celebrity but as an american. >> we just showed the brief clip of youpegth convention. >> i was really nervous. i get paid to be other people for a living. to speak as other people. as the convention i was speaking as myself in a room that big and the stakes are so high in this election. i ft like ias a trendous ho a a big responsibility. i kind of prefer being other people. >> that's an incredible room. energy in there. you get off one line and you feel the energy come back to you and it kind of builds. >> rlly exciting. >> i think we have a clipfou ki le listen. >> today there are people out there trying to take away rights that our mothers, our grandmothers and our great grandmothers fought for. rights that we fought fo ourigote our right to choose. our right to affordable, quality education. equal pay. access to health care. and we, the people, cannot l th en ow about that, mike barnicle. sign her up. >> when you watched yourself, you said y
presidency. imagine what it would mean for civil rights and voting rights and so much more. >> reporter: but if the president is re-elected, what effect would it have on the court? >> well, president obama could have big impact on the court is if one of the more conservative justices, like swing vote anthony kennedy or justice antonin scalia who are both in their mid-70s, if they retired, then president obama could replace a conservative or a right leaning moderate. >> reporter: here's who could make the nominee list if president obama wins a second term. california attorney general harris is getting a lot of buzz. >> the california attorney general has political experience, which is really missing on the court right now. >> reporter: another name circulating is ja kwlen wen. if she's nominated, the california-based federal appeals judge would make history as the court's first asian-american justice. but that's no guarantee. and for example if ruth bader ginsburg is the only justice to retire, the liberal side of the court would not get any bigger. just a little younger. >> and as you k
to debunk a false -- debunk false claims. i think "the weekly standard" would agree. when we look at civil rights, it should be not about the quality of results. -- it might reflect that there is a republican primary going on, or it might reflect the fact that they are feeling the same journalistic standards. -- they are failing the same journalistic standards. i think this varies over time. that is just a false logic. i do not know that it is 3 to 1, and i do not know the time you're talking about. some of that is republicans criticizing other republicans. it is certainly not three to one on our side. other questions? we have two here, if we can get the microphone over to the table in front of the cameras. i am keeping her hopping here. >> i am michael, and given what we have just heard about people choosing to believe their side or their candidate or their team of people that believe they are objective journalists, and i count myself among them, and i do not believe that many voters believe that being a liar is a disqualifying traits. what are you guys seeing? what can happen on the grou
respect the right in a situation of civil war? >> is not just accepting the right, it is the position of the international world. it is not achievable in every country right now. there are lots of countries where you don't have those kinds of rights were we have solid relations with china. and so is an aspiration and it is an aspiration that increasingly, over time, has become a reality in some many parts of the world. and so we keep pushing that aspiration ford and keep hoping that country after country, one group of people after another will learn to live in peace and build a representative form of government. when you say democracy, you think american jeffersonian model. there are lots of models. but is the aspiration that everyone has the right to self- determination. i hope it will happen in syria as well. we don't know how to make it happen, but remember that we live with all the countries in the arab spring for years without those rights being there. we found it necessary to accommodate ourselves to the fact that these were autocratic leaders and it was their people that finall
it was strengthening our economy that we defend the civil liberties and rights of every new hampshire citizens because we want to attract people of talent and energy to our states. that means defending our marriage equality law and making sure that women can chart their own destiny by making their own health care decisions .. i love the public debate between you and ovide lamontagne. has been on social issues. any that you disagree and, how much impact they have on the economy and the impact -- business of new hampshire? hassan: i was on a plan last spring and i sat next to a young man who recruits for a major new hampshire business. he was telling me how important the marriage equality law that we passed was to his recruiting efforts because young people were more interested in coming to new hampshire to work here because we were committed to treating all of our granite staters the police. similarly for women the ability to make their own decisions about when to have families, about what kind of balance they want to seek in the workplace, finishing school, all of those things relate to their ability
involve actual involvement on the ground. i don't know the attitude that either. so right now i think we are kind of, we are kind of in a difficult position where it's horrible to see these things unfold every day on television, but it is a civil war. and you hope you can find a point of fatigue reached on the part of both sides so the and then try to find a kind of peaceful resolution. it's not very peaceful after what you've seen what's been done in the cities with all the loss of life. but i think neither side is close to that point of fatigue, and i do not see anyone really coming to a solution involving the use of military force to break the elections apart, or to oppose a settlement on the situation. so it's going to continue to be ugly for a long period of time. can't tell you how long. it might be two weeks. it might be to use. remember what his father was prepared to do back in the early '80s, killing 80,000 people, and not giving up alawite control of that country. and that's what assad is facing. not just his personal destiny and his family, but his whole people. >> okay, than
attacks in syria. you can see a bomb go off right here, near military headquarters. wednesday, the deadliest day so far in the civil war which has claimed an estimated 30,000 lives. >>> here at home, thousands the of criminal cases have been thrown into question this massachusetts this morning, after a chemist at the state's drug lab, admitted she faked lab results. ignoring procedures, forging signatures when working on more than 34,000 cases. some defendants have already been freed or had their sentences disspended. >>> a terrifying ordeal for a manager at carl's jr. after taking time off to recover, she was fired from her job. carl's jr. is not saying why. and some new developments in the decades-old search for teamsters' boss, jimmy hoffa. police in detroit have received a new trip that hoffa is buried under the driveway you see there. they're now taking soil samples. thousands of tips have come in when hoffa vanished in 1975. >>> finally, the prime minister of great britain, perhaps a little embarrassed this morning. he was on david letterman last night. got a pop quiz on
in the history of the modern church because it has set up a 1i68 court. it's a civil court which is also opened up to the public. >> father gall when the butler was arrested, he told investigators that this could be a healthy thing to bring the church back on the right track. was he in any sense right? >> it seems that the butler was trying in some way to help the pope. in fact, the information that was revealed through the documents that the butler stole is in no way incriminating of the pope himself. in fact, the pope comes off as very kind and gentle throughout all those documents. it doesn't make sense what the butler is claiming. that's one of the things they want, to ascertain the fullness of the truth which is what the pope wants. >> we're expecting a pardon from the pope ultimately. why? >> perhaps. the pope hasn't given any indication he will pardon him. he has indicated his great affection for paulo gab iele. the entire family lives in the vatican and are citizens of the vatican city state. nonetheless, i'm sure the pope wants to first determine that he has fully revealed the truth as
these people, train journalists, train politicians, and train them how to provide services. right now a lot of these areas aren't getting electricity. they aren't getting sanitation. how do you help the civil service help deliver services to the country so everything's not falling apart, and then waiting for that day after that we've been talking about? but as you see, it's continuing to spiral, many deaths, and while they're planning for the day after, people are dying right now. >> when is the day after? when is the day after? all right elise labott, thank you so much for that. we appreciate it. john, back to you. >> all right, 14 minutes after the hour right now. lots of news this morning. let's get the headlines from christine romans. >> with two days to go before the first of three critical debates, president obama is hunkering down in nevada, getting prepped with massachusetts senator john kerry. he's scheduled to fly in to play the part of mitt romney in practice sessions. the president trying to lower expectations at a rally in las vegas yesterday. >> mitt romney, he's a debater. i'
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)